freemexy's Blog

Russia demands access to VPN providers’ servers


Russia demands access to VPN providers’ servers The Russian censorship agency Roskomnadzor has ordered 10 VPN service providers to link their servers in Russia to its network in order to stop users within the country from reaching banned sites.VPN service If they fail to comply, their services will be blocked, according to a machine translation of the order.The 10 VPN providers are ExpressVPN, HideMyAss!, Hola VPN, IPVanish, Kaspersky Secure Connection, KeepSolid, NordVPN, OpenVPN, TorGuard, and VyprVPN. In response at least five of the 10 – Express VPN, IPVanish, KeepSolid, NordVPN, TorGuard and – say they are tearing down their servers in Russia but continuing to offer their services to Russian customers if they can reach the providers’ servers located outside of Russia. A sixth provider, Kaspersky Labs, which is based in Moscow, says it will comply with the order. The other four could not be reached for this article. IPVanish characterized the order as another phase of “Russia’s censorship agenda” dating back to 2017 when the government enacted a law forbidding the use of VPNs to access blocked Web sites. “Up until recently, however, they had done little to enforce such rules,” IPVanish says in its blog. “These new demands mark a significant escalation.” The reactions of those not complying are similar. TorGuard says it has taken steps to remove all its physical servers from Russia. It is also cutting off its business with data centers in the region “We would like to be clear that this removal of servers was a voluntary decision by TorGuard management and no equipment seizure occurred,” TorGuard says in its blog. “We do not store any logs so even if servers were compromised it would be impossible for customer’s data to be exposed.” TorGuard says it is deploying more servers in adjacent countries to protect fast download speeds for customers in the region. IPVanish says it has faced similar demands from Russia before and responded similarly. In 2016, a new Russian law required online service providers to store customers’ private data for a year. “In response, we removed all physical server presence in Russia, while still offering Russians encrypted connections via servers outside of Russian borders,” the company says. “That decision was made in accordance with our strict zero-logs policy.”When comes to the issue of online privacy and security, we suggest to use a VPN, and our recommendation is RitaVPN.Qwer432 https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/how-to-watch-english-premier-league-football-online-from-any-location/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/wifi-password-hacker-cause-data-leakage/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/3-things-activists-can-do-to-strengthen-their-privacy-and-security-on-the-internet/

The VPN is dying, long live zero trust


The VPN is dying, long live zero trust The venerable VPN, which has for decades provided remote workers with a secure tunnel into the enterprise network, is facing extinction as enterprises migrate to a more agile, granular security framework called zero trust, which is better adapted to today’s world of digital business.VPN VPNs are part of a security strategy based on the notion of a network perimeter; trusted employees are on the inside and untrusted employees are on the outside. But that model no longer works in a modern business environment where mobile employees access the network from a variety of inside or outside locations, and where corporate assets reside not behind the walls of an enterprise data center, but in multi-cloud environments. Gartner predicts that by 2023, 60% of enterprises will phase out most of their VPNs in favor of zero trust network access, which can take the form of a gateway or broker that authenticates both device and user before allowing role-based, context-aware access. There are a variety of flaws associated with the perimeter approach to security. It doesn’t address insider attacks. It doesn’t do a good job accounting for contractors, third parties and supply-chain partners. If an attacker steals someone’s VPN credentials, the attacker can access the network and roam freely. Plus, VPNs over time have become complex and difficult to manage. “There’s a lot of pain around VPNs,” says Matt Sullivan, senior security architect at Workiva, an enterprise software company based in Ames, Iowa. “They’re clunky, outdated, there’s a lot to manage, and they’re a little dangerous, frankly.” At an even more fundamental level, anyone looking at the state of enterprise security today understands that whatever we’re doing now isn’t working. “The perimeter-based model of security categorically has failed,” says Forrester principal analyst Chase Cunningham. “And not from a lack of effort or a lack of investment, but just because it’s built on a house of cards. If one thing fails, everything becomes a victim. Everyone I talk to believes that.” Cunningham has taken on the zero-trust mantle at Forrester, where analyst Jon Kindervag, now at Palo Alto Networks, developed a zero-trust security framework in 2009. The idea is simple: trust no one. Verify everyone. Enforce strict access-control and identity-management policies that restrict employee access to the resources they need to do their job and nothing more. Garrett Bekker, principal analyst at the 451 Group, says zero trust is not a product or a technology; it’s a different way of thinking about security. “People are still wrapping their heads around what it means. Customers are confused and vendors are inconsistent on what zero trust means. But I believe it has the potential to radically alter the way security is done.”When comes to the issue of online privacy and security, we suggest to use a VPN, and our recommendation is RitaVPN.Qwer432 https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/how-to-unblock-websites/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/what-is-the-best-vpn-provider-for-uae-in-2019/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/why-does-one-need-a-vpn/

Ancient Chinese painting auctioned for almost US$60 million


Ancient Chinese painting auctioned for almost US$60 million A nearly 1,000-year-old ink painting by one of China's greatest literati masters Su Shi fetched US$59.5 million at auction, Christie's said Monday (Nov 26). To get more chinese painting, you can visit shine news official website. The auction house has described the Song Dynasty artwork created by Su as "one of the world's rarest Chinese paintings".Entitled "Wood and Rock", the ink-on-paper handscroll depicts a dragon-like old tree with withered branches and a sharp rock resting at its root. The painting was the most expensive item ever sold in Christie's Asia, it said. Su Shi, also known as Su Dongpo, is one of the most important cultural figures in Chinese history and was an esteemed scholar, poet, prose-writer, painter, calligrapher and statesman. The 185.5cm-long scroll is inscribed with calligraphy and the poems of four important literati of the 11th century in China, and also exhibits the seals of 41 collectors.The number of the works securely attributed to him are very few, probably only two or three. They are extremely rare," Jonathan Stone, deputy chairman for Christie's Asian art department, said in an earlier preview. In 2010, "Dizhuming", a Chinese calligraphy scroll by Huang Tingjian - Su Shi's student - sold for US$64 million at Poly Auction in Beijing. Hong Kong's auction houses have seen frenzied bidding among Asian buyers in recent years, with sales of diamonds, paintings and ancient ceramics shattering world records. A 10-metre-long triptych entitled "Juin-Octobre 1985" by Zao Wou-Ki - one of the 20th century's most prominent Chinese painters - fetched US$65 million at Sotheby's Hong Kong in September.

CBOT soybeans up sharply amid renewed trade hopes


CBOT soybeans up sharply amid renewed trade hopes Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) soybean futures gained double digits in the past trading week over renewed U.S.-China trade optimism, while wheat and corn fell sharply due to downbeat export sales.To get more cbot soybeans, you can visit shine news official website. The most active soybean contract for January delivery rose 12.75 cents during the week ending Dec. 6, or 1.45 percent, to close at 8.895 U.S. dollars per bushel. March corn was down 4.5 cents, or 1.18 percent, to settle at 3.7675 dollars per bushel. March wheat fell 17.25 cents, or 3.18 percent week on week, to end at 5.245 dollars per bushel. CBOT soybeans had suffered losses in four straight weeks. During this past week, the market was finally buoyed by renewed hopes among investors for a U.S.-China trade deal, which is crucial to the outlook of U.S. soybean exports. On Friday an announcement from the Customs Tariff Commission of China's State Council said that China, as the world's top soybean buyer, is working on tax exemptions on part of the soybeans and pork imported from the United States in light of applications submitted by related enterprises. The commission will dedicate a range of goods to be excluded from tariff countermeasures against the U.S. Section 301 measure, said the announcement. Chinese enterprises import a certain amount of goods from the United States through market-based procurement and in accordance with domestic needs. The enterprises are expected to purchase goods eligible for exemption on the basis of independent negotiation, import as they see fit, and bear the related profits or losses, it said. Technically, nearby CBOT soybean futures were at the most oversold level since last May, according to the Chicago-based agricultural research firm AgResource. Ted Seifried, chief market strategist of Zaner Ag Hedge, shared a similar view. "I think we're just simply too oversold in the soybeans. We've gotten down to price levels that I think might be too cheap." As for CBOT wheat and corn, downbeat export sales dragged down their prices. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), for the period of Nov. 22-28, the net U.S. wheat sales reached only 228,100 metric tons for the 2019/20 marketing year, down 63 percent from the previous week and 45 percent from the prior four-week average. For the same period, the net U.S. corn sales were pegged at 546,100 metric tons, down 32 percent from the previous week and 18 percent from the prior four-week average. In another USDA report, for the week ending Nov. 28, export wheat inspections totaled 246,988 metric tons, down sharply from 434,703 metric tons during the previous week. "The world market needs a spark to push (wheat prices) to new highs," AgResource wrote in a weekend note. Meanwhile, CBOT corn traders are keeping their eyes on South American weather conditions and the trade talks between Washington and Beijing, hoping that a trade deal can raise the demand for U.S. corn supplies.

Why Doesn't the Black Hole Image Look Like the One From Interstellar?


Why Doesn't the Black Hole Image Look Like the One From Interstellar? No one knew what a black hole looked like before today. Sure, we thought we knew, thanks to simulations and the now-famous black hole featured in the movie Interstellar.To get more interstellar black hole, you can visit shine news official website. But today, scientists behind the Event Horizon Telescope unveiled an image of the 6.5-billion-solar-mass black hole at the center of the (relatively) nearby galaxy M87. And a quick glance will show you that it doesn’t look anything like Gargantua, the black hole in the movie Interstellar. So, we asked physicists behind both images to help explain the differences. First off, if you’re completely lost, black holes are objects predicted by the theory of general relativity to have such an incredible gravitational field that light can’t escape once it enters a region called the event horizon. Today, scientists behind the Event Horizon Telescope unveiled an image of this phenomenon—not a photograph, but a reconstructed picture of the shadow that the black hole casts on the light behind it, created from data taken by eight telescopes around the world. The black hole unveiled today looked more or less exactly the way that the Event Horizon Telescope scientists, guided by Einstein’s theory of relativity, expected it to look. Like, to an impressive degree. See:They’re not as different as you might expect. “The image in Interstellar is almost correct,” Kazunori Akiyama, postdoctoral researcher at the MIT Haystack Observatory who led the team that created the EHT’s image, explained to Gizmodo. Perhaps most notably, the Interstellar black hole has a thin streak of matter around its center, which M87's black hole seems to lack. That’s a simple difference to explain—initial evidence shows that we’re viewing M87's black hole from closer to one of the poles, rather than from head on. The disk of matter around M87 would be obscured by the observation angle, Akiyama explained. Take Saturn’s rings—they don’t cross the planet when you look at it from the top or bottom. But we’re not looking at the black hole completely head on, and that’s the origin of the other main difference. M87‘s black hole seems to have a far brighter crescent-like shape on the bottom left. What you’re actually looking at is the fact that M87's black hole is probably spinning. The material orbiting the black hole would also spin, and spacetime itself would warp around the black hole. That means that material moving toward us would appear brighter, while material moving away from us would appear dimmer—which you can see in the M87 image. “Christopher Nolan omitted that brightening because the human eye would likely not be able to discern the brightness differences on the two sides of the hole when the overall brightness is so extreme,” Kip Thorne, Cal Tech physicist and advisor on the film Interstellar, told Gizmodo. Nolan did take some artistic license with the appearance of the film’s black hole, as we’ve previously explained, including things like lens flare. But there are other differences as well, explained Thorne. The black hole envisioned by Thorne had a much thinner, opaque disk of material. The black hole observed by the Event Horizon Telescope team appears to have a much thicker disk, but one that is somewhat more transparent to light. These are relatively minor points. The Event Horizon Telescope will continue to take images, both of M87's black hole and of the black hole at the center of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. These images will create even clearer pictures—and will surely help science fiction produce more accurate visions of black holes than ever before.

Even VPN encryption has its limits


Even VPN encryption has its limits In a recent column you made the following statement: “The safest thing to do is to use a virtual private network, which encrypts ALL traffic between you and all websites.” VPN encryption may not have the reach that you are stating. A VPN can only encrypt the transmission between the client and the service provider. The communication between the VPN service provider and the destination of the transmission is likely to be unencrypted.unblock websites If the VPN service provider has an agreement with the destination it will be encrypted, but it is unlikely that Facebook or any other large web presence is establishing these VPN connections, primarily because they would not be able to provide the throughput necessary for the expected traffic to their sites through a VPN. VPNs are perfect for protecting people on public Wi-Fi from the other folks that are on that Wi-Fi. But they do not provide end-to-end encryption. A: You’re absolutely right. Using a VPN does two things. First, it encrypts the transmissions between your computer and the VPN’s servers. Secondly, it masks your IP address. The transmissions between the VPN server and the third-party site are not encrypted unless the third-party site supports that. So yes, there is still some exposure. But it is only with respect to the actual content of your message if it is intercepted between the VPN server and the third-party site. Unless you provide identifying information in the message it can’t be tracked back to you. The bottom line: Be aware of where you are and what you’re transmitting. If you’re using public Wi-Fi for virtually anything, I recommend using a VPN. Many sensitive sites — such as banks — don’t, however, allow connections over a VPN. So in such cases I recommend not making such connections over public Wi-Fi.When comes to the issue of online privacy and security, we suggest to use a VPN, and our recommendation is RitaVPN.Qwer432 http://www.buyvpnservice.net/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/5-best-torrent-sites/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/popular-adult-site-exposed-user-data/

China moves to block internet VPNs from 2018


China moves to block internet VPNs from 2018 China will completely block access to much of the global internet as part of a sweeping crackdown aimed at suppressing dissent and maintaining the Communist party’s grip on power.VPN service The government has ordered China’s three telecommunications companies to completely block access to virtual private networks, or VPNs, by February 2018, Bloomberg News reported, citing anonymous sources. The three internet providers, China Mobile, China Unicom and China Telecom, are all state-owned. China operates the largest internet censorship regime in the world, blocking access to thousands of websites including Google, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Internet controls also mean news and commentary critical of the ruling Communist party and information about events like the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre are almost impossible to find within China. But millions of Chinese citizens circumvent China’s censorship system, known as the Great Firewall, by using a VPN, allowing unfettered access to any website. The latest directive comes as China prepares for a twice a decade political meeting in Beijing in late 2017, with various factions within the government jockeying for dominance in any potential shuffle of top officials. It also comes on the heels of a 14-month “cleanup” of internet services announced in January, part of president Xi Jinping’s push for so-called “internet sovereignty”. “This is a significantly escalated form of internet control and shows there is unprecedented urgency and desperation at the top of the government,” said Xiao Qiang, a professor focusing on censorship in China at the University of California, Berkeley. “This is clearly about the highest levels of political struggle and the different factions using the internet as their battlefield. “If Xi’s opponents cannot release information inside China because of the censorship apparatus, they do it outside China and then the information filters back.” Xiao pointed to recent cracks in the Great Firewall, including allegations of corruption levelled by a Chinese businessman in New York that have managed to circulate widely within China. The claims, many unverified, have been seen as damaging to the head of the country’s corruption watchdog and one of Xi’s closest allies. In the coming months Xiao predicted the authorities would step up their internet crackdown: “There have always been controls, but this will be another level”. The ban on VPNs could also harm academics, software developers and foreign businesses. For years Chinese researchers have complained they lack adequate access to overseas journals and methods to communicate with universities around the world, while developers rely on code hosted on websites based outside China. Foreign businesses in China often use VPNs to secure their company data or communicate with company headquarters. It is not clear whether the ban will affect corporate VPNs. “This is ridiculous. If they’re as interested in security and stability as they say they are, then they should leave VPNs accessible,” Kaiser Kuo, former head of international communications at Chinese tech giant Baidu, posted online. “The number of people using them in China is really small, but really vocal — and I don’t think they’ll just take this lying down. Will reflect very badly on the party. Dark days ahead. Earlier this month a popular Chinese VPN was forced to shut down after “receiving a notice from regulatory departments”. China has instituted bans on VPNs and other methods to bypass censorship in the past, especially during high-level government meetings in Beijing. But it remains to be seen whether the latest directive will become permanent.When comes to the issue of online privacy and security, we suggest to use a VPN, and our recommendation is RitaVPN.Qwer432 http://www.fastritavpn.com/ http://www.fastvpnproxy.com/ http://www.vpnsnetflix.com/

Do VPNs Still Work in China?


Do VPNs Still Work in China? Do VPNs still work in China? If you’re in China right now, you’re probably aware of how difficult it is to connect to a VPN right now. Don’t worry – you’re not alone. This is a problem people are having all across the country right now. So what has happened? Do VPNs no longer work in China? These past few months have been particularly hard on VPN users in China. With the Hong Kong protests, the trade wars and other major narratives China wants to control, the Ministry of Information has been particularly mean.Buy VPN All that to say this: no matter which VPN you use right now, you’re going to have connection problems. Personally, this is why I subscribe to multiple VPN services…but that’s just me. I’ll start by saying this: as of January 2020, it is possible to connect to a VPN in China. It’s been difficult to connect at times but yes, it is possible. The connectivity of VPNs in China goes on a cycle, a fact that you probably know well if you’ve lived in China for more than a year. During important government meetings (such as the Congress meeting last March), major holidays or during sensitive anniversaries, it becomes harder to connect to VPNs.That’s why it’s important to choose a VPN that dedicates significant resources to serving the China market. Personally, I use ExpressVPN – which has been incredibly reliable for me these past few years – but I also subscribe to a number of other VPNs that work great in China. No matter what VPN you use, there are a few steps you can take to ensure that you can stay connected even when it feels like your VPN no longer works in China. Make Sure Your VPN App is Updated One of the best ways to improve VPN connectivity is to keep your app updated. VPN services like ExpressVPN and NordVPN make important tweaks to their connection protocols when connections become difficult. You may not be able to log on to the websites directly, but the links above are dynamic links that direct you to an unblocked page from within China.VPN download Check the China Server Status of Your VPN Any VPN service that serves the China market well will have a status page that will provide timely updates on connection issues, possible fixes and tips on how to connect to VPN servers in China. Examples of this would be the ExpressVPN Status page, the NordVPN status page, and the VyprVPN status page. Each of these webpages should be updated on a weekly, if not daily basis, and often tell you exactly which servers are working in China. Change Server Locations and Connection Protocols (multiple times) Most VPNs like ExpressVPN allow you to change server and protocol connections as much as you want. If you find that you aren’t able to connect to your VPN in China, try changing to a different server location or connection protocol. And don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t work after 2-3 changes. During the worst times, it often takes me 10-15 changes before I’m able to find a connection that works.When comes to the issue of online privacy and security, we suggest to use a VPN, and our recommendation is RitaVPN.Qwer432 https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/best-vpn-for-online-streaming/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/how-does-ritavpn-protect-your-privacy/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/how-to-prevent-common-types-of-password-hacking/

Looking For Secure VPN Services?


Looking For Secure VPN Services? a bit of an Internet buzzword nowadays, because the business model of the Internet has now shifted towards data collection. Today, most users surf the web unaware of the fact that websites and online services collect their personal information, including search histories, location, and buying habits and make millions by sharing your data with advertisers and marketers.unblock websites If this is not enough, then there are governments across the world conducting mass surveillance, and hackers and cyber criminals who can easily steal sensitive data from the ill-equipped networks, websites, and PCs. So, what's the solution and how can you protect your privacy, defend against government surveillance and prevent malware attacks?No matter which Internet connection you are using to go online, one of the most efficient solutions to maximize your privacy is to use a secure VPN service. In this article, we have introduced two popular VPN services, TigerVPN and VPNSecure, which help you in many ways. But before talking about them, let's dig deeper into what is a VPN, importance of VPN and why you should use one. What is a VPN & Why You Should Use It? A VPN, or Virtual Private Network, is nothing but an encrypted tunnel between you and the Internet. Once you connect directly to your VPN service, every Internet browsing activity of yours will go through the VPNs servers and blocks third parties, including government and your ISP, from snooping on your connection. Secure and Encrypted Web Browsing: VPNs enhance online security by keeping your data secured and encrypted. Online Anonymity: VPNs help you browse the Internet in complete anonymity so that no one can track the origin of your Internet connection back to you. Prevent Data & Identity Theft: VPNs encrypt all data transferred between your computer and the Internet, allowing you to keep your sensitive information safe from prying eyes and significantly reducing the risk of security breaches and cyber attacks. Unblock Websites & Bypass Internet Restrictions: VPN essentially hides your IP address, so your visits to any restricted sites do not register with the third-party, including your government or ISP, trying to block you, ensuring you enjoy the online freedom of speech. Hide Your Browsing History From ISP: VPNs stop your ISP from logging your web visit, as the spying ISP will not be able to see what you are visiting on the Internet. Multiple Device Supported: Many VPN services usually support multiple devices and work on all operating systems, such as Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, and iOS. With multiple device support, you can set up your PC, work computer and smartphone to access one VPN at the same time.When comes to the issue of online privacy and security, we suggest to use a VPN, and our recommendation is RitaVPN.Qwer432 https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/best-torrent-search-engines-you-should-consider/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/are-there-any-good-free-vpn-services/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/three-steps-to-use-ritavpn/

Introducing Warp: Fixing Mobile Internet Performance and Security


Introducing Warp: Fixing Mobile Internet Performance and Security April 1st is a miserable day for most of the Internet. While most days the Internet is full of promise and innovation, on “April Fools” a handful of elite tech companies decide to waste the time of literally billions of people with juvenile jokes that only they find funny.fast VPN Cloudflare has never been one for the traditional April Fools antics. Usually we just ignored the day and went on with our mission to help build a better Internet. Last year we decided to go the opposite direction launching a service that we hoped would benefit every Internet user: 1.1.1.1. The service's goal was simple — be the fastest, most secure, most privacy-respecting DNS resolver on the Internet. It was our first attempt at a consumer service. While we try not to be sophomoric, we're still geeks at heart, so we couldn't resist launching 1.1.1.1 on 4/1 — even though it was April Fools, Easter, Passover, and a Sunday when every media conversation began with some variation of: "You know, if you're kidding me, you're dead to me." No Joke We weren't kidding. In the year that's followed, we've been overwhelmed by the response. 1.1.1.1 has grown usage by 700% month-over-month and appears likely to soon become the second-largest public DNS service in the world — behind only Google (which has twice the latency, so we trust we’ll catch them too someday). We've helped champion new standards such as DNS over TLS and DNS over HTTPS, which ensure the privacy and security of the most foundational of Internet requests. And we've worked with great organizations like Mozilla to make it so these new standards could be easy to use and accessible to anyone anywhere. On 11/11 — yes, again, geeky — we launched Cloudflare's first mobile app. The 1.1.1.1 App allowed anyone to easily take advantage of the speed, security, and privacy of the 1.1.1.1 DNS service on their phone. Internally, we had hoped that at least 10,000 people would use the app. We ended up getting a lot more than that. In the months that followed, millions of Android and iOS users have installed the app and now experience a faster, more secure, and more private Internet on their phones. Super Secret Plan Truth be told, the 1.1.1.1 App was really just a lead up to today. We had a plan on how we could radically improve the performance, security, and privacy of the mobile Internet well beyond just DNS. To pull it off, we needed to understand the failure conditions when a VPN app switched between cellular and WiFi, when it suffered signal degradation, tried to register with a captive portal, or otherwise ran into the different conditions that mobile phones experience in the field. More on that in a second. First, let’s all acknowledge that the mobile Internet could be so much better than it is today. TCP, the foundational protocol of the Internet, was never designed for a mobile environment. It literally does the exact opposite thing it should when you're trying to surf the Internet on your phone and someone nearby turns on the microwave or something else happens that causes packet loss. The mobile Internet could be so much better if we just upgraded its underlying protocols. There’s a lot of hope for 5G, but, unfortunately, it does nothing to solve the fact that the mobile Internet still runs on transport protocols designed for a wired network. Beyond that, our mobile phones carry some of our most personal communications. And yet, how confident are you that they are as secure and private as possible? While there are mobile VPNs that can ensure traffic sent from your phone through the Internet is encrypted, let’s be frank — VPNs suck, especially on mobile. They add latency, drain your battery, and, in many cases, are run by companies with motivations that are opposite to actually keeping your data private and secure.When comes to the issue of online privacy and security, we suggest to use a VPN, and our recommendation is RitaVPN.Qwer432 https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/what-is-the-best-vpn-for-the-united-kingdom/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/top-movie-download-sites-you-should-consider/ https://www.ritavpn.com/blog/protect-yourself-when-using-public-wifi/